Creative Little Scientists at the Open University

Creative Little Scientists was a transnational project working across 9 countries. The Open University was one of three UK partners.

Researchers at the Open University who worked on the project include:


Professor Anna Craft

Professor Anna Craft

Anna Craft was Professor at The Open University and the University of Exeter. She coined the term ‘possibility thinking’ to describe the move from what is to what might be in a problem-solving, route-finding approach to creativity.

She published several influential books including Creativity Across the Primary Curriculum (2000) and Creativity and Education Futures: Learning in a Digital Age (2011). Anna’s research was undertaken in partnership with teachers, documenting and supporting what they were doing to nurture the imagination. She had a major input into the Creative Little Scientists project and its conceptualization of creativity. She died in 2014.

You can find out more about Anna’s work here: http://annacraftcreativity.uk


Professor Teresa Cremin

Professor Teresa Cremin

Teresa Cremin is Professor of Education (Literacy) at The Open University in the Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies.

Teresa has been a practicing primary teacher, a staff development co-ordinator in a local authority, and has worked extensively in Higher Education both with initial teacher education students and with practicing professionals.

Her research focuses mainly on teachers' literate identities and practices, the pedagogies associated with children's volitional reading and writing (within and beyond the classroom), and creative teaching and learning from the early years through to Higher Education.

You can find out more about Teresa’s research here


Dr Jim Clack

Dr Jim Clack

Jim Clack worked at the Open University as the research associate for the Creative Little Scientists project. His PhD had focused on creativity in mathematics education in the primary years. Subsequently he joined the University of Bedfordshire and is now a Lecturer in the Education at the Department of Education Studies.

You can find out more about Jim’s work here


Recommended reading

The Reading for Pleasure Tree

Find out how the University of Cambridge Primary School have used our research to support reading throughout the school. This research-informed approach has been praised by Ofsted in their recent inspection report. In this account by Aimee Durning their approach is represented as a nurturing Reading for Pleasure Tree.
researchrichpedagogies.org

Joy of reading

In this blog Simon Smith explores how teachers can build community through shared reading. He argues whole class reading can build a sense of ‘belonging, a shared history and experience’. He ends with 7 great tips for reading aloud to your class.
smithsmm.wordpress.com

Reflections on OU/UKLA RfP Cambridge conference

In her recent blog school governor and adult literacy professional Kerry Scattergood reflects on what she has gained from attending our recent OU/UKLA RfP conference in Cambridge. In her latest posting she outlines the impact on her support for adults, while in her previous post she suggests how the insights from the research can also be taken forward in schools.
everydayliteracyproject.wordpress.com


About this project